Wednesday, November 09, 2016

I dunno


I stop blogging about current events and look what you people do.


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9 comments:

Ms. L.B. said...

WIIIAI! We've missed you. Delving into 100-years of the NYTimes is, let's face it, self-indulgent and ultimately irrelevant in the face of current reality. This doesn't give you a unique voice.

Please come back. America is screwed. We need your erudition and humor now more than ever.

Weaver said...

Oh, please, the last century stuff is fine (fasssskinating in fact!). Given political blogging here tended towards justifiably trenchant criticism of the current president, I can only imagine that it tailed off for the same reason I assiduously avoid social media - you woulda got totally shame-swarmed by lesser-evilism enforcers. And I don't see the rigid strictures of Decent Liberal nicespeak being likely to loosen now that the Orange Id is heading to the White House. I mean, Dogtrumpet isn't even there yet and they're already busy golden-aging the administration of the Prince of Drones, Scourge of Whistle-blowers and Destroyer of Libya. Oh, wait, he took Romneycare national - let's build him a Palace of Remembrance!

In any case, aren't we about to start reading about Warren G. Harding, whose administration would serve nicely as a useful template to what y'all are about to receive in the current age? Oh, no, actually that won't be until 2021, after the election of President Warren (coincidence?!) four years ahead of schedule. I'll guess I'll just have to keep cheering myself up with the war stuff until then.

seedyjay said...

I also write about what was going on 100 years ago today and always look at your blog first, to see where what we think is important or entertaining overlap. It will suck to lose your commentary on things but I understand just how much work it is to do this every single day for not much return other than your own edification and satisfaction. I wish you luck and success in whatever you choose to do and urge you to keep on writing in the entertaining fashion we have come to know and love. CDJ

WIIIAI said...

seedyjay: where do you write about that?

seedyjay said...

On facebook. I also publish famous birthdays for the day and whatever holidays and observances are on that day in the world. https://www.facebook.com/carl.jochen

WIIIAI said...

Aha, I hadn't seen that before. So if you've seen me complaining about someone on Facebook who rips off my posts (not just the research, but my comments and even jokes), know that I wasn't complaining about you.

Anonymous said...

After January 20th, when America is Great Again like it was 100 years ago, you will be able to blog about both at the same time. Justice Jefferson Beauregard Sessions, Gov. Coleman Blease, Attorney General Rudolph Giuliani, what's the difference?

Just be nice because First Lady Melania will be watching.

seedyjay said...

That's pretty funny, Anonymous, I have been telling people that Trump reminded me of Coleman Blease. WIIIAI, I try to be conscious of plagiarism and copyright considerations. Where you have helped me the most is coming up with things that are odd or not widely reported but I always try to find out more to put them in historical context and absolutely do not copy things you have written. Furthermore, I always have things that you haven't written about and don't use most of the things you come up with. Whether I continue to write about 100 years ago or not, your blog will continue to be one of the first places I check out every day for as long as you are willing to put forth the effort, I like your perspective and writing style. Cheers.

WIIIAI said...

Thanks. Your posts seem to be fine, but there is another FB page that annoys the shit out of me. My weirdest plagiarism experience on the Web was seeing one of my tweets used in a nationally syndicated cartoon.

Trump is indeed Blease reborn. The resentments, the outbursts, the weird tangents in inappropriate forums (rants against Coca Cola in state of the state addresses).