Friday, January 01, 2021

Today -100: January 1, 1921: 1921, bitches!



Fiume accepts the terms Italy imposes on it, including giving back all the munitions stolen from the Italian military and the departure of any “legionaries” not native to Fiume.

Harding will break tradition and use an automobile in his inaugural parade instead of a carriage. Jackson rode a horse, because of course he did.

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3 comments:

Mary Grace McGeehan said...

I’d be interested in your take on why the Saturday Evening Post cover features a baby coal miner. Obviously related to the strikes and violence of the previous year, but the SEP isn’t exactly The Liberator. Their website says the cover “anticipates an end” to the Alabama strike; not sure what that means. I wondered whether J.C. Leyendecker snuck a tribute to the strikers past the Post’s editors, but a quick search didn’t reveal any evidence of left-wing sympathies.

I neglected the 100-year-old news in 2020 and resolve to do better this year.

WIIIAI said...

Would have been funnier if the baby were covered in coal dust. Leyendecker New Years babies occasionally engaged in manual labor, auto mechanic and such, so I'm not even sure this is intended to be political. Some of the covers seem to me to be stretching to find something new to do with the baby/cherub, and this may have been one of those.

My news reading just reached the start of the Harding presidency. Mencken's take-down of his inaugural speech is quite something.

I'm hoping to do better on 100-year-old movies this year. Fairbanks! Max Linder! The Gish sisters! Valentino! Maybe not so much Valentino!

Mary Grace said...

Yeah, or he could be carrying a dead canary.

I look forward to hearing what Mencken has to say about Harding. Meanwhile I've been doing some catch-up reading in The Bookman about the literary tastes of the two candidates. Both Ohio newspaper editors profess the default middle-aged white guy preferences, history and biography. Harding seems to see books as a means to an end, though, while Cox comes across as a truly passionate reader and advocate of libraries.

I want to improve on my sorry record on movies this year, having so far only seen one in three years: the 1917 Swedish film The Girl from the Marsh Croft when I was writing about Selma Lagerlof.